January 2015 Support Groups – Northern Neck and Middle Peninsula

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January 13th, 10:30am
For Caregivers
The Orchard
2 Delfae Drive
Warsaw, VA 22572
Respite available with reservation.
Please call Jill White, 804-313-2400, for more information.

January 14th, 10:30am
For Caregivers
Alzheimer’s Association Office – DeHardit House
7335 Lewis Avenue
Gloucester, VA 23061
No respite available.
Please contact Ted Leonard, 804-642-9189, for more information.

January 15th, 6pm
For Caregivers
Alzheimer’s Association Office – DeHardit House
7335 Lewis Avenue, Gloucester, VA 23061
No respite available
Please call Ellie Galloway, 804-695-9382, for more information.

January 20th, 10:30am
For Caregivers
Port Town Village Apartments
111 Port Town Lane
Urbanna, VA 23175
No respite available.
Please contact Barbara Swain, 804-832-1571, or Lisa Jones, 804-695-9008, for more information.

January 22nd, 10:30am
For Caregivers
Commonwealth Assisted Living
460 S. Main Street
Kilmarnock,VA 22482
Respite care available with reservation.
Please contact Ellie Galloway, 804-695-9382, for more information.

January 2015 Support Groups – Fredericksburg

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January 6th, 10am
For Caregivers
Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center
2nd Floor Conference Room
4600 Spotsylvania Avenue
Fredericksburg, VA 22408
Please contact Lori Myers, 540-370-0835, for more information.

January 12th, 6:30pm
Early Stage for Caregivers and Persons with Dementia
Please call the Chapter Office, 540-370-0835, for more information.

January 20th, 1:30pm
For Caregivers
Homecare America
2017 Plank Road
Fredericksburg, VA 22401
Please contact Lori Myers, 540-370-0835, for more information.

January 20th, 7pm
For Caregivers
Carriage Hill Health & Rehabilitation Center
6106 Health Center Lane
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Please contact Judy Scheibe, 540-898-1378, for more information.

January 2015 Support Groups – Richmond and Tri-Cities

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Younger-Onset Group
This is a Support Group for individuals who were diagnosed with a dementia disease under the age of 65. For more information on this group, please contact the Alzheimer’s Association Greater Richmond Chapter office at 804-967-2580.

January 1st, 6pm
For Caregivers
Good Shepherd Baptist Church
1127 N. 28th Street
Richmond, VA 23223
Please call Wanda Hunt, 305-8394, for more information.

January 5th, 10am
For Caregivers
Mt. Vernon Baptist Church
11220 Nuckols Road, Glen Allen, VA 23059
Please call Jessica Samet, 967-2580, for more information

January 6th, 3pm
For Caregivers
First Baptist Church
401 N. Second Avenue
Hopewell, VA 23860
Please call Blanche Castelow, 748-5585, or June Gilliam, 748-6668, for more information.

January 6th, 7pm
For Caregivers
First Baptist Church
800 Thompson Street
Ashland, VA 23005
Please call Bob Junod, 752-2219, for more information.

January 6th, 7pm
For Caregivers
Second Branch Baptist Church
12217 Second Branch Road
Chesterfield, VA 23838
Please call Christina Dhir, 536-9229, for more information.

January 13th, 7pm
For Adult Children
Bon Air Methodist Church
1645 Buford Road
Room 207
N. Chesterfield, VA 23235
Please call Lynda Gormus, 320-0619, or Erin Davidson, 514-2142, for more information.

January 14th, 9:30am
For Caregivers
Hanover Adult Day Center
7231 Stonewall Parkway
Mechanicsville, VA 23111
Please call Vivian Bagby, 321-1649, or Barbara Allen, 782-1942, for more information.

January 14th, 10am
For Caregivers
New Life United Methodist Church
900 Old Hundred Road
Midlothian, VA 23114
Bob Schaefer, 310-7991, or Leigh Hilldrup, 839-0236, for more information.

January 15th, 11:30am
For Caregivers
Vista Park Memory Care
550 Flank Road
Petersburg, VA 23805
Please call LaChelle Rouse, 861-4358, for more information.
Lunch provided.

January 15th, 7pm
For Caregivers
Lucy Corr Village
6800 Lucy Corr Court
Chesterfield, VA 23832
Please call Blanche Castelow, 748-5585, or Edith Byrnes, 271-4441, for more information.

January 20th, 10am
For Caregivers
Lakewood Manor
1900 Lauderdale Drive
Henrico, VA 23238
Please call Mary Ann Johnson, 967-2582, for more information.

January 20th, 2pm
For Caregivers
Bon Air Methodist Church
1645 Buford Road
Family Life Center, Blanchette Brown Room
N. Chesterfield, VA 23235
Please call Nancy Lentz, 967-2586, for more information.

January 20th, 7pm
For Caregivers
Brandermill Woods
14311 Brandermill Woods Trail
Midlothian, VA 23112
Please call Merle Kahn, 967-2575, for more information.

January 22nd, 1:30 pm
Early Stage for Caregivers and Persons with Dementia
Please Call the Chapter Office, 967-2580, for more information.

January 22nd, 6:30pm
For Caregivers
New Bridge Baptist Church
5701 Elko Road
Sandston, VA 23150
Please call Connie Tucker, 241-2056, for more information.

January 24th, 12pm
For Caregivers
First Union Baptist Church,
3510 Dill Road
Richmond, VA 23222
Please call Jacki Page, 321-2573, for more information.

January 28th, 4:30pm
For Caregivers
Riverside PACE
315 Brown Street
Petersburg, VA 23803
Please call 800-272-3900 for more information.

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION ADVOCATES CELEBRATE ALZHEIMER’S LEGISLATIVE VICTORY

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION ADVOCATES CELEBRATE ALZHEIMER’S LEGISLATIVE VICTORY WITH AN EYE TO THE PRESIDENT’S 2016 BUDGET
Alzheimer’s Accountability Act Incorporated into Funding Bill Signed into Law
Alzheimer’s Association Statement – Washington, D.C., December 17, 2014

As the largest Alzheimer’s advocacy organization in the world, the Alzheimer’s Association, and its relentless advocates, applaud Congress for creating a formal process to ensure that scientific judgment will guide them in future Alzheimer’s research funding decisions. This critical provision comes from the Alzheimer’s Accountability Act (H.R. 4351/S. 2192), which was fully incorporated within the fiscal year 2015 funding bill signed into law by the President.

Because of this action, Congress will be equipped with the best information to determine necessary Alzheimer’s research funding levels in each year leading up to 2025 to achieve the primary goal of the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease, creating a means to prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer’s disease.

“In setting funding levels, Congress has told us that they want to hear directly from the nation’s top scientists. That’s exactly what the Alzheimer’s Accountability Act does by connecting scientists with appropriators,” said Harry Johns, president and CEO of the Alzheimer’s Association. “The Alzheimer’s Association urged the introduction and passage of this Act so that Congress understands what science will bring us to the day when there will be survivors of Alzheimer’s, just as there now are for the other major diseases in our country.”

Introduced in April, the Alzheimer’s Accountability Act calls for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to submit a Professional Judgment Budget for Alzheimer’s disease research each year until 2025 to achieve annual research milestones established under the National Alzheimer’s Plan. It will reflect the state of Alzheimer’s knowledge and the required investments in research identified by leading scientists to achieve the plan’s 2025 objective.

With the Alzheimer’s Accountability Act, Congress has created a mechanism that will utilize rigorous scientific judgment, rather than shifting political interests and unforeseen events, to guide Congressional funding allocations to achieve the 2025 goal.

Alzheimer’s Association grassroots advocates and staff held thousands of congressional meetings to secure support for the Alzheimer’s Accountability Act since the bill’s introduction. While the Alzheimer’s Association and its sister organization, the Alzheimer’s Impact Movement, were the only two organizations to endorse and work to advance the Alzheimer’s Accountability Act, the legislation received strong, bipartisan support in both the House and the Senate.

In addition to the Alzheimer’s Accountability Act, the funding bill included a $25 million increase for Alzheimer’s research, which comes on the heels of an unprecedented $122 million increase for Alzheimer’s research, education, outreach and caregiver support in fiscal year 2014.

Together, these increases bring annual federal funding for Alzheimer’s research to $591 million. However, scientists have stated that accomplishing the goal of the National Alzheimer’s Plan will require a commitment of at least $2 billion a year.

“According to leading experts, we must dramatically increase research funding to accomplish the primary goal of the National Alzheimer’s Plan to prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer’s by 2025. The Alzheimer’s Accountability Act will ensure that Congress hears directly from scientists what they will need to successfully achieve the federal government’s goal,” said Johns. “We now eagerly look forward to the President’s fiscal year 2016 budget with the tools in place to implement urgently needed, significant increases in Alzheimer’s funding to finally stop the human and economic devastation it causes.”

There are currently more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease at a cost to the nation of $214 billion a year, according to the Alzheimer’s Association 2014 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures report. Though Alzheimer’s is not normal aging, because advancing age is the greatest risk factor and Americans are living longer than ever before, those numbers are projected to soar to as many as 16 million by 2050, costing the nation $20 trillion over the next 40 years.

For more information on Alzheimer’s disease and available resources, visit the Alzheimer’s Association at alz.org/grva.

CONTACT:
Erin Heintz, 202.638.7040;
eheintz@alz.org
Alzheimer’s Association Media Line, 312.335.4078,
media@alz.org

Holiday Gift Ideas for Individuals with Alzheimer’s Disease or Dementia

Gift boxes

Early Stages:
• Electric coffee or teapots which turn off after a short period of time
• Day planners to keep track of appointments and special days
• Medication holders with timers which can be set to signal when doses are due
• Photo albums with names and dates next to each picture
• A Safe Return registration. It might be easier to get someone to wear the bracelet
or necklace if it is given as a gift.

Middle Stages:
• Bird feeder
• Simple-to-manage clothing like jogging suits or clothes with Velcro fasteners
• Gift certificates for a hair salon or manicure
• Music, especially older music such as barber shop, country, or oldies
• Short trips in the car
• Hand-held shower
• Bath/shower chair
• Slip-on shoes/Velcro closure

Late Stage:
• Cuddly stuffed animals
• Dolls (many women seem to enjoy a doll baby)
• Music, especially from the 30’s and 40’s and classical music
• Soft pillows and afghans
• Colorful mobiles and crystal prisms
• Blooming plants
• Hand and body lotions for a back rub or hand massage

Caregivers Wishlist:

• The gift of time for themselves!!
Offer to provide respite care a few hours a week or tie it to a specific activity such as a gift certificate for a manicure or a facial, an invitation to a movie or the theater or dinner out, with respite care provided. Take a meal with paper products
so there is no cooking or clean-up.
• Books by favorite authors
• Cassette player and tapes
• Cordless phones (useful for private conversations)
• DVDs of old-time classic movies and musicals
• Digital ear thermometer (faster and easier to use)
• Intercom, especially the portable ones that can be moved from room to room
• Exit alarms for the doors
• Cordless electric razor (safer and prevents electric shock)

Why I Walk – Kat Simons

Why I Walk

My name is Kat Simons and I Walk to End Alzheimer’s for the Central Virginia community.

A few years ago, I watched as my neighbors, a sweet and kind couple, had their lives turned upside down when the husband was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

It was shocking, devastating, and heartbreakingly sad to see how the disease changed everything for them. He was a former college coach who gave his all to his team and now, there he was, relying on his wife to give her all to him as his caregiver.

This year, I was honored to be the emcee for the Richmond Walk to End Alzheimer’s and help raise awareness about the disease, the programs offered by the Association, and the need for research.

The statistics ARE scary!

Every 67 seconds someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s.

Alzheimer’s is not just an old person’s disease and it does not discriminate as it affects individuals from all walks of life. It can, and more than likely will, touch all of us personally sooner than later.

The Walk to End Alzheimer’s is an amazing experience. To look out at the sea of people and realize that all of us are united for one reason – to stop Alzheimer’s disease in its tracks!

Get involved!

We need EVERYONE’S help if we want to end Alzheimer’s in our lifetime.

The time to act is NOW!

The Walks to End Alzheimer’s may be over, but there is still time to donate.

Get involved and make a difference for the millions of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias!

Northern Neck – Middle Peninsula: Donate at http://bit.ly/ALZ_Walk_NorthernNeck

Fredericksburg: Donate at http://bit.ly/ALZ_Walk_Fredericksburg

Tri-Cities: Donate at http://bit.ly/ALZ_Walk_TriCities

Richmond: Donate at http://bit.ly/ALZ_Walk_GRVA