August 2015 Support Groups – Richmond and Tri-Cities

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August 3rd; 10am
For Caregivers
Mt. Vernon Baptist Church
11220 Nuckols Road, Glen Allen, VA 23059
Please call Jessica Samet, 804-967-2580, for more information.

August 4th; 10:30am
For Caregivers
Second Branch Baptist Church
12217 Second Branch Road
Chesterfield, VA 23838
Please call Edith Byrnes, 804-271-4441, or Sharon Condrey, 804-590-9305, for more information.

August 4th; 3pm
For Caregivers
First Baptist Church
401 N. Second Avenue
Hopewell, VA 23860
Please call Blanche Castelow, 804-748-5585, or June Gilliam, 804-748-6668, for more information.

August 4th; 7pm
For Caregivers
First Baptist Church
800 Thompson Street
Ashland, VA 23005
Please call Bob Junod, 804-752-2219, for more information.

August 6th; 6pm
For Caregivers
Good Shepherd Baptist Church
1127 N. 28th Street
Richmond, VA 23223
Please call Wanda Hunt, 804-305-8394, for more information.

August 11th; 7pm
For Adult Children
Bon Air Methodist Church
1645 Buford Road
N. Chesterfield, VA 23235
Please call Lynda Gormus, 804-320-0619, or Erin Davidson, 804-514-2142, for more information.

August 12th; 9:30am
For Caregivers
Hanover Adult Day Center
7231 Stonewall Parkway
Mechanicsville, VA 23111
Please call Vivian Bagby, 804-321-1649, or Barbara Allen, 804-782-1942, for more information.

August 12th; 10am
For Caregivers
New Life United Methodist Church
900 Old Hundred Road
Midlothian, VA 23114
Please call Bob Schaefer, 804-310-7991, or Leigh Hilldrup, 804-839-0236, for more information.

August 18th; 10am
For Caregivers
Lakewood Manor
1900 Lauderdale Drive
Henrico, VA 23238
Please call Beth Meyers, 804-967-2598, for more information.

August 18th; 2pm
For Caregivers
Bon Air Methodist Church
1645 Buford Road
Family Life Center, Blanchette Brown Room
N. Chesterfield, VA 23235
Please call Nancy Lentz, 804-967-2586, for more information.

August 18th; 7pm
For Caregivers
Brandermill Woods Health Care Center
2100 Brandermill Parkway
Midlothian, VA 23112
Please call Merle Kahn, 804-967-2575, for more information.

August 20th; 7pm
For Caregivers
Lucy Corr Village
6800 Lucy Corr Court
Chesterfield, VA 23832
Please call Blanche Castelow, 804-748-5585, or Edith Byrnes, 804-271-4441, for more information.

August 22nd; 12pm
For Caregivers
First Union Baptist Church
3510 Dill Road
Richmond, VA 23222
Please call Jacki Page, 804-321-2573, for more information.

August 25th; 6pm
For Caregivers
St. Mary’s Hopsital
5801 Bremo Road, Room 163
Richmond, VA 23226
Please call Mary Ann Johnson, 804-967-2582, for more information.

August 27th; 1pm
For Caregivers
Chickahominy YMCA
5401 Whiteside Road
Sandston, VA 23150
Please call Connie Tucker, 804-241-2056, or Beth Meyers, 804-967-2598, for more information.

August 27th, 1:30pm
Early Stage for Caregivers and Persons with Dementia
Please Call the Chapter Office, 804-967-2580, for more information.

Younger-Onset Group
This is a Support Group for individuals who were diagnosed with a dementia disease under the age of 65. For more information on this group, please contact the Alzheimer’s Association Greater Richmond Chapter office at 804-967-2580.

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10 Ways to Love Your Brain

The evidence is mounting – Central Virginians can reduce their risk of cognitive decline by making key lifestyle changes. That is the conclusion of a new research summary published in early June in Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.

With this in mind, the Alzheimer’s Association offers 10 Ways to Love Your Brain, tips that may reduce the risk of cognitive decline.

1 – Break a sweat.
Engage in regular cardiovascular exercise that elevates your heart rate and increases blood flow to the brain and body. Several studies have found an association between physical activity and reduced risk of cognitive decline.

2 – Hit the books.
Formal education in any stage of life will help reduce your risk of cognitive decline and dementia. For example, take a class at a local college, community center or online.

3 – Butt out.
Evidence shows that smoking increases risk of cognitive decline. Quitting smoking can reduce that risk to levels comparable to those who have not smoked.

4 – Follow your heart.
Evidence shows that risk factors for cardiovascular disease and stroke – obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes – negatively impact your cognitive health. Take care of your heart, and your brain just might follow.

5 – Heads up!
Brain injury can raise your risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Wear a seat belt, use a helmet when playing contact sports or riding a bike, and take steps to prevent falls.

6 – Fuel up right.
Eat a healthy and balanced diet that is lower in fat and higher in vegetables and fruit to help reduce the risk of cognitive decline. Although research on diet and cognitive function is limited, certain diets, including Mediterranean and Mediterranean-DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), may contribute to risk reduction.

7 – Catch some Zzz’s.
Not getting enough sleep due to conditions like insomnia or sleep apnea may result in problems with memory and thinking.

8 – Take care of your mental health.
Some studies link a history of depression with increased risk of cognitive decline, so seek medical treatment if you have symptoms of depression, anxiety or other mental health concerns. Also, try to manage stress.

9 – Buddy up.
Staying socially engaged may support brain health. Pursue social activities that are meaningful to you. Find ways to be part of your local community – if you love animals, consider volunteering at a local shelter. If you enjoy singing, join a local choir or help at an afterschool program. Or, just share activities with friends and family.

10 – Stump yourself.
Challenge and activate your mind. Build a piece of furniture. Complete a jigsaw puzzle. Do something artistic. Play games, such as bridge, that make you think strategically. Challenging your mind may have short and long-term benefits for your brain.

In addition to reducing your risk of cognitive decline, these tips may also reduce your risk of dementia. Evidence for reducing risk of dementia is currently strongest in relation to formal education and the avoidance of head injury; other tips show indication of possibly reducing risk. Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, is one of the nation’s largest public health crises. Alzheimer’s is an irreversible neurological disease that impairs cognition, orientation and functional capacity, and it is the only cause of death among the top 10 life-threatening conditions in the United States that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed.

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October Educational Programs – Fredericksburg Area

EducationInformationForBlog

The Fredericksburg regional office of the Alzheimer’s Association Greater Richmond Chapter will offer the following educational programs to the general public during the month of September. Advance registration is required for the educational programs. Please call Lori Myers at 540-370-0835 for more information or to register.

October 25th; 9am-1pm
Living with Alzheimer’s: Moderate Stage Program for Family Caregivers
Mary Washington Hospital
Classroom A
1001 Sam Perry Boulevard
Fredericksburg, VA 22401

To view the list of educational programs for October, please visit http://www.alz.org/grva/in_my_community_education.asp

October Support Groups – Fredericksburg

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October 7th; 10am
For Caregivers
Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center
4600 Spotsylvania Ave., 2nd Floor Conference Room
Fredericksburg, VA 22408
Please contact Lori Myers, 540-370-0835, for more information

October 13th; 6:30pm
Early Stage- For Caregivers and for Persons with Dementia
Call the Chapter Office for Information, 540-370-0835

October 21st; 1:30pm
For Caregivers
Homecare America
2017 Plank Road
Fredericksburg, VA 22401
Please contact Lori Myers, 540-370-0835, for more information

October 21st; 7pm
For Caregivers
Carriage Hill Health and Rehabilitation Center
6106 Health Center Lane
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Please contact Judy Scheibe, 540-898-1378, for more information

For more information about our support groups, please visit http://www.alz.org/grva/in_my_community_support.asp

October Educational Programs – Richmond and Tri-Cities Area

EducationInformationForBlog

The Alzheimer’s Association Greater Richmond Chapter will be offering the following programs to the general public during the month of October. Advance registration is required by calling 804-967-2580.

October 14th; 6:30-7:30 pm
Caring for the Person with Dementia and Giving Support to the Caregiver
Beth Sholom Parkside
1550 John Rolfe Parkway
Henrico, VA 23238

October 16th: 10am-2pm
Living with Alzheimer’s and Dementia: Moderate Stage – for Caregivers
St. John’s Episcopal Church
12201 Richmond Street
Chester, VA 23831
Lite lunch provided

October 22nd; 3:30-5:30pm
Caring for the Person with Dementia and Giving Support to the Caregiver
Riverside PACE Petersburg
315 Brown Street
Petersburg, VA 23803

October 22nd; 6:30-8pm
Care Partner Frustrations
Shalom Baptist Church
6395 Mechanicsville Turnpike
Mechanicsville, VA 23111

October 29th; 9am-Noon
A Slice of Knowledge for the Caregiver: Family Dynamics and Stress
Heritage Public Library
6125 Chesapeake Circle
New Kent, VA 23124

To view the list of educational programs for October, please visit http://www.alz.org/grva/in_my_community_education.asp

September Educational Programs – Fredericksburg Area

EducationInformationForBlog

 

 

The Fredericksburg branch of the Alzheimer’s Association Greater Richmond Chapter will offer the following educational programs to the general public during the month of September. Advance registration is required. Please call Lori Myers at 540-370-0835 for more information or to register.

September 17th; 9:30am-12:30pm
Living with Alzheimer’s: Late Stage – for Caregivers
Salem Church Library
2607 Salem Church Road
Fredericksburg, VA 22407

September 18th; 1:30-3pm
Getting Started: What to do if you Suspect a Family Member has Dementia or has been Diagnosed with Dementia
2217 Princess Anne Street; 2nd Floor Conference Room
Fredericksburg, VA 22401

To view the list of educational programs for October, please visit http://www.alz.org/grva/in_my_community_education.asp

Alzheimer’s Findings Seen as a Possible New Window to Understanding the Disease

Scientists at the Mayo Clinic have discovered a possible new link between an abnormal protein in the brain and the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, a breakthrough that could open new avenues to understanding the disease and finding effective treatments.

Abnormal forms of the protein, which assists DNA in coding and building new proteins inside the cell, appear to increase the atrophy of regions of the brain important to memory. And it could be a trigger of some kind, perhaps independently initiating the onset of Alzheimer’s-related dementia when combined with two other proteins whose abnormalities have long been implicated in the disease.

These findings, and more, were presented during the recently concluded six-day Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, AAIC, in Copenhagen.

AAIC is the world’s largest conference of its kind, bringing together researchers from around the world to report and discuss groundbreaking research and information on the cause, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders.

To read more about the Mayo Clinic discovery, click here.

To see all the 2014 AAIC video highlights, click here.

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